Master of Architecture - University of Newcastle

Hayley Skelton

Hayley Skelton

The Tea Room

The Tea Room acts as a vehicle to communicate the issues surrounding the refugee crisis. The project critically analyses our global response to forced human displacement that is transpiring in the Middle East, and is the antithesis of the ‘quick-fix’ dialogue embedded within the humanitarian sector. 

The project is located in the small town of Azraq, Jordan, on a major desert route that historically facilitated shelter and trade for caravans on their journey across Arabia. In keeping with that history, it has now become a safe haven for Syrian refugees on their journey south to escape ongoing human rights violations.

The Tea Room is the product of a deep exploration into landscape, site, climate, culture, politics and the universal need for human connection. The project provides a social space that revolves around the simple idea of finding shade and shelter, and sharing tea, acknowledging the necessity of community to overcome experiences of great trauma.

The built form, in its isolation, evolves from limited resources and found materials in the landscape, rising up from the earth, grounding itself in the salty desert sand.

Hayley Skelton

The Tea Room

The Tea Room acts as a vehicle to communicate the issues surrounding the refugee crisis. The project critically analyses our global response to forced human displacement that is transpiring in the Middle East, and is the antithesis of the ‘quick-fix’ dialogue embedded within the humanitarian sector. 

The project is located in the small town of Azraq, Jordan, on a major desert route that historically facilitated shelter and trade for caravans on their journey across Arabia. In keeping with that history, it has now become a safe haven for Syrian refugees on their journey south to escape ongoing human rights violations.

The Tea Room is the product of a deep exploration into landscape, site, climate, culture, politics and the universal need for human connection. The project provides a social space that revolves around the simple idea of finding shade and shelter, and sharing tea, acknowledging the necessity of community to overcome experiences of great trauma.

The built form, in its isolation, evolves from limited resources and found materials in the landscape, rising up from the earth, grounding itself in the salty desert sand.